Date

8-1-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts

Department

History

First Adviser

William J. Bulman

Abstract

This study explores the seventeenth century Non-Jurors and their distinct ecclesiastical vision and polity through the career of Jeremy Collier. Rather than doctrinaire High Churchmen or Jacobites in disguise, the Non-Jurors carried their preexisting high view of episcopacy to an attack upon the royal supremacy over the Church of England. By examining the Absolution Controversy of 1696, and the preceding polemics between leading Non-Jurors and conforming churchmen (Stillingfleet and Sherlock), this study argues that the Non-Juror movement offered a radical challenge to both so-called Latitudinarians and High Churchmen. As an ordained presbyter, Jeremy Collier asserted that the Church of England, including its government and liturgy, was a wholly separate institution from both parliament and the crown. The Non-Jurors provide a window onto the political and ecclesiastical struggles that continued from the Restoration into the revolutionary settlement of 1688, exploring how the concept of separation between Church and state developed.

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History Commons

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