Date

2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Teaching, Learning, and Technology

First Adviser

Columba, Lynn

Abstract

Augmented reality (AR) and mobile devices show promise for promoting mathematics practices and an increase in perseverance. Using an experimental pre-/posttest comparable condition group design, this study investigated (a) whether differences exist in students’ number sense outcome scores based upon the type of board game they played with (augmented reality version versus traditional) and (b) find whether students’ perseverance levels based upon the type of board game they played were different. Using a classroom observation protocol designed to measure perseverance and a pre-/posttest on subitizing and approximate number system, the study used a 2x2 mixed repeated measures ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, and linear regression models to analyze these assessments. The early number sense scores of students playing an AR version of the researcher designed game called Creature Counting (n=30) was compared with students who played a traditional board game version of the same game (n=26).Results of this empirical study show students who participated in the AR version of Creature Counting had growth in number sense scores. Findings from the study showed that students in both groups improved between the pre-/posttest on the subitizing assessment, with the AR group making greater improvement. The findings also showed that students in both groups improved between the pre-/posttest on the approximate number systems assessment. However, there was no statistically significant difference in improvement when comparing children in the intervention group to children in the comparison group. Additionally, for children in the intervention group, perseverance scores collected did not predict number sense scores after playing Creature Counting. Implications for these findings are discussed.

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