Date

1966

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts

Department

English

First Adviser

James R. Frakes

Abstract

What I shall attempt to demonstrate, in the following pages, is that the key to whatever hope and meaning Faulkner offers his readers in Light in August lies in his careful delineation of the rebirth of Gail Hightowere, a man who shows not only the destructive consequences of resisting life but also the possibilities of renewal. Some general attention to the nature of Southern Calvinism and to the place of Hightower's story in the novel will precede a close examination of the process of rebirth. It is my conviction that this process, properly understood, offers an important dimension to our understanding and assessment of the novel.

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