Date

2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts

Department

Earth and Environmental Sciences

First Adviser

Holland, Breena

Abstract

Throughout the last decade, research on the relationship between fine particulate air pollution and fetal mortality has progressed in significant ways. This study contributes to the literature by exploring the impact of exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution on stillbirth in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. It identifies the critical window of exposure - when fetuses are most vulnerable to the impact of pollution - during the last months of pregnancy. I utilize multiple ordinary least squares (OLS) regression analysis with a time-series design. Among the three time lags (no lag, 1- and 2-month lags) examined, I find a positively and statistically significant association between monthly stillbirth rates with 1-month lag and monthly average concentration levels of PM2.5, while controlling for other ambient air pollutants and temperature. I find no statistically significant association between monthly average concentration levels of PM2.5 and monthly stillbirth rate with no lag or 2-month lag.

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