Date

2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Education

Department

Educational Leadership

First Adviser

White, George P.

Other advisers/committee members

Beachum, Floyd D.; Donohue, Louise; Silva, Jack

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current principals' beliefs and behaviors in an attempt to identify the driving forces behind principal behaviors related to indirectly and directly affecting student achievement. The study utilized Canonical Correlation Analysis to examine the relationship between principals' perceived self-efficacy (efficacy for management, efficacy for instructional leadership, and efficacy for moral leadership), school and personal characteristics (principal gender, school level, student socioeconomic status, perceived parental involvement, and time spent on student discipline), and principals' behaviors related to indirectly and directly affecting student achievement. The study found that perceived self-efficacy was significantly related to principal behavior. The study also found that school and personal characteristics were not significantly related to principal behavior.Scholars have argued that self-efficacy, which this study found to contribute significantly to principal behavior, is within a principal's control. However, the five variables that were found to be insignificant in this study (principal gender, school level, student socioeconomic status, perceived parental involvement, and time spent on student discipline) are either completely out of a principal's control or very difficult to control. This study's findings should encourage principals that they have control over the variables that correlate with their behaviors related to indirectly and directly affecting student achievement. These findings do not present any definitive answers, but rather demonstrate that the relationship between self-efficacy and principal behavior is worthy of further exploration.

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