Date

2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Adviser

Malt, Barbara C.

Abstract

Many bilingual speakers speak each of their languages in ways that differ from monolingual speakers of those languages, but it is not known if these differences are inevitable or can be influenced by learning conditions. In two experiments, 129 English speakers named objects in English, were trained on the lexical pattern of five Russian words either with or without feedback and either blocked or intermixed training (Experiment 1) or with or without metalinguistic knowledge and with or without English trials (Experiment 2) and then named objects again in English. Additionally, a control group provided English naming data at two different times to compare English consistency with and without second language training. Though there were few differences in the experimental conditions, participants in these conditions were less consistent in their English naming than those in the control condition, suggesting that bilingual speakers' lexicons are inevitably linked.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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