Date

2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Counseling Psychology

First Adviser

Caskie, Grace I. L.

Other advisers/committee members

Inman, Arpana G.; Liang, Christopher T. H.; Santiago, Michelle

Abstract

Significant attitudinal differences between fraternity members and non-fraternity male college students have been found in previous research (e.g., Allison & Risman, 2013). The present study first examined differences between these groups in attitudes towards traditional gender role attitudes and attitudes towards lesbians and gay men. Next, the relationships between traditional gender role attitudes and attitudes towards lesbians and gay men was examined, followed by the examination of whether participation in a fraternity moderated these relationships. Data from 98 participants who identified as male and heterosexual were obtained. Greek fraternity-affiliated participants adhered to more traditional gender roles and held more negative attitudes towards lesbians and gay men than did non-affiliated, independent participants. A hierarchical multivariate multiple linear regression demonstrated that participants who had greater adherence to traditional gender roles also had more negative attitudes towards lesbians and gay men. Fraternity membership partially moderated this relationship. This research holds important practice and research implications for student affairs professionals.

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