Date

2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts

Department

History

First Adviser

Simon, Roger D.

Abstract

The historiography of President Franklin Roosevelt's fireside chats, up until this point, have focused on FDR's ability to radiate confidence via these captivating and extremely popular radio addresses. When examined more closely, a clear outline of the New Deal takes shape, suggesting FDR's true intentions behind the fireside chats: to educate the public of the administration's legislative endeavors. Roosevelt's second fireside chat, delivered on May 7, 1933, provides a vision for how the New Deal would correct the agricultural and industrial ills of the Great Depression and, in turn, revitalize the United States. In order to connect the fireside chat with Roosevelt's legislative agenda, documents from key advisors and Roosevelt himself are considered in connection with the creation of the second fireside chat. More importantly, a collection of letters written to FDR in reaction to this specific fireside address are examined, exposing a passionate public response to the New Deal.

Share

COinS